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Deinonychus

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Deinonychus
Real Deinonychus

Name meaning

"Terrible Claw"

Diet

Carnivore

Height

0.9 m (34 inches)[1]

Length

3.4 m (11 ft)[1]

Weight

73 kilogram (160 lbs)[1]

Location

USA (Montana, Wyoming, possibly Maryland)

Game appearances

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (video game)
Jurassic Park III: Park Builder

"The point is, you are alive when they start to eat you."
Dr. Alan Grant(src)


Deinonychus was the first of the raptors (technically called "dromaeosaurid") to be known from a nearly complete skeleton. Velociraptor had been discovered forty years earlier but was known only from a skull and a few bones of its hands and feet.[1]

The skeleton of Deinonychus were first to show the now infamous sickle-shaped retractable foot claw (8 inch), used for ripping open the guts of its prey. Deinonychus also had a nasty bite, with over 60 knife-like teeth.[1]

Dr. John Ostrom discovered Deinonychus in 1964. Dr. Ostrom believed that this dinosaur was an agile, swift predator, more like a warm-blooded mammal or bird than a cold-blooded crocodile.[1]

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ClassificationEdit

P2Uw7

Concept art of the JP Velociraptor superimposed against three other Raptor taxa.

At the time Michael Crichton wrote the first novel Deinonychus was included in the Velociraptor genus. The type-species Deinonychus antirrhopus was sometimes called Velociraptor antirrhopus.[2] This reclassification is mentioned by Alan Grant in the first novel:

"Although Deinonychus is now considered one of the Velociraptors..."[3]

Because Deinonychus was classified as a Velociraptor, the raptors from the three films were based more on Deinonychus than Velociraptor, probably because Deinonychus was much larger and thus more dangerous.

About the Raptors named Velociraptors in the films Dr. Holtz and Dr. Brett-Surman wrote:

"The genetically recreated Velociraptors in the Jurassic Park movies are closer in size to a very large Deinonychus than to the true Velociraptor, which was much smaller".[1]

Jurassic Park Franchise Edit

Deinonychus fanart by Hellraptor

Fanart by Hellraptor

Raptors named Deinonychus appear in a couple of Jurassic Park video games and toy lines.



NovelsEdit

In Jurassic Park, at the dig site in Montana, Alan Grant discovers a fossilized raptor hatchling. He classifies it as Velociraptor antirrhopus, which is in modern insight a Deinonychus species.

Video gamesEdit

Deinonychus2142
  • In The Lost World: Jurassic Park video game Deinonychus is an enemy in various levels. It bears a resemblance to the Velociraptor that appeared in the game as well, only different in colors. Oddly, it's a bit smaller than the Velociraptor, instead of being bigger. In the game they're also called "Deinon-Raptor", likely to differentiate them from the Veloci-Raptors.They are grey and have yellow spots.
  • In Jurassic Park III: Park Builder, Deinonychus is a carnivore that can be recreated from paleo-DNA. Ironically the Velociraptor can also be created.
DeinonychusParkBuilder

Deinonychus from Jurassic Park III: Park Builder.

  • It was planned to appear in Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis, but was scrapped,[4] possibly in favor of the Velociraptor. However, since Deinonychus is virtually identical to Jurassic Park's depiction of Velociraptor, it's possible to create one by simply copying and renaming the Velociraptor file, as well as re-coloring the existing raptor model.



ToylinesEdit

Deinonychus JP

The prototype Deinonychus. Notice it has the same colors as the film's male Raptors.

There had initially been plans to produce a Deinonychus toy for The Lost World Series 1. It was to be a repaint of the Jurassic Park Series 1 Velociraptor (thus possibly making it another Velociraptor repaint). [1]

The same paint job was later used for Jurassic Park: DinosaursOrnithosuchus.


ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Dinosaur Field Guide, page 63.
  2. Paul, Gregory S. (1988). Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. New York: Simon and Schuster. pp. 464pp. ISBN 978-0671619466.
  3. Jurassic Park (novel), page 131.
  4. Dinosaurs cut from Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis.

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